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Microwave Sensing Through the Subsurface for Addressing the Water Puzzle

November 30 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Microwave Sensing Through the Subsurface for Addressing the Water Puzzle will be presented by Prof. Mahta Moghaddam from the University of Southern California (USC). It is organised by IEEE A&P / MTT Chapter Victoria and the Department of Civil Engineering Monash University. This talk will cover emerging research on sub-surface characterization of soil water-content from surface to the root zone, variations in permafrost properties, and ground water, in order to,map profiles. Thursday 30th November 2017, from 5:30 pm(refreshments) for a 6:00 – 7.00 pm talk at Level 6, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne (Monash University Law Chambers). This is a free event but registration is requested. RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/microwave-sensing-through-the-subsurface-for-addressing-the-water-puzzle-tickets-39804863418. Enquires to Stefan Burger, Chair, IEEE AP/MTT Chapter, Victoria (s.j.burger@ieee.org) or Prof. Jeff Walker, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Monash University (jeff.walker@monash.edu) or further information from www.ieeevic.org

 

Abstract:
Active microwave remote sensing has long been recognized as a key component of an effective environmental observing strategy, due to the strong relationships of radar
measurements with geometric and compositional properties of the Earth’s landscape. In particular, radar signals of various wavelengths are sensitive to changes in water state and content of foliage, soils, ice, aquifers, and permafrost. Characterizing and monitoring water resources are of critical importance in today’s world because there is only a limited supply of fresh water globally. With increasing population and changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the Intelligence Community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. Much of the environmental remote sensing work discussed in this talk has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new low-frequency (e.g., P-band) spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, electromagnetic scattering and inverse scattering models, and in-situ sensor networks. The emerging research on subsurface characterization is discussed, which aims to map the profiles of soil water content from surface to the root zone, variations in permafrost properties, and ground water.

Abstract:
Active microwave remote sensing has long been recognized as a key component of an effective environmental observing strategy, due to the strong relationships of radar measurements with geometric and compositional properties of the Earth’s landscape. In particular, radar signals of various wavelengths are sensitive to changes in water state and content of foliage, soils, ice, aquifers, and permafrost. Characterizing and monitoring water resources are of critical importance in today’s world because there is
only a limited supply of fresh water globally. With increasing population and changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the Intelligence
Community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. Much of the environmental remote sensing work discussed in this talk has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new low-frequency (e.g., P-band) spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, electromagnetic scattering and inverse scattering models, and in-situ sensor networks. The emerging research on subsurface characterization is discussed, which aims to map the profiles of soil water content from surface to the root zone, variations in permafrost properties, and ground water.

 

Details

Date:
November 30
Time:
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Event Category:

Venue

Level 6, 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne (Monash University Law Chambers)
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